The “Not So” Science Behind Dubstep

You would never see this type of music here, but alas, there is a significant exposure factor that has some “unknown” attraction?

Does the definition of music, “A beat within time” qualify for all musical styles?

As far as I am concerned here, music is considered to be a universal language that is spoken by the rare talented, but understood by everyone. Dub-step may seem very passe to the commoners who ever go close to such “radical” music.

Even this, yes this was considered radical at a time.

Staying true to my musical roots, I HAD to use this type of music as an example. It may be hard to believe, but Ragtime in it’s whole entirety was called the “Devil’s Music,” with its odd rhythmic structure to give someone a heart attack if someone would listen to the syncopated rhythm.

But isn’t Dub step the same thing?

I know, I know; you guys are probably mad a me for saying such a thing on here, but this music is cracking! Literally! If one were to listen to the common song written in the same fashion, you’d see that both share some remarkable similarities!

  • Is/Was criticized by millions
  • People who listen to it are/were called “Devil Worshipers”
  • Is/Was a new type of music that literally evolved overnight and captivated millions

And now the more technicalities:

  • Both are written in syncopated rhythm
  • Dub step is mainly a mash up of triplets
  • Ragtime also uses compilations of various rhythms such as scat, straight, and triplet

I wouldn’t go this far to forget the great composers and virtuous of the past!

Respect the greats!

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Why classical?

Why not?

I thought I had a certain common ground  when it came to talking about music, but I guess it’s really difficult if you’re talking to somebody who has no idea about the music I listen to. Yes, you’ve heard only two of a million musicians on this blog, but what really gets to me is when somebody has no genuine idea to what classical music is. In this pop, rap, and hip-hop dominated society, having a good conversation with commoners about classical music is one out of a million. We are surrounded by urban culture (if you happen to live in Los Angeles), and it doesnt take any effort to hear the music of today just by turning the radio on. If you take your time and listen to the countless songs being played, there really isn’t any variety that shows music’s true color in diversity. Instead, you have electronic voices telling me to “eff the police,” and “smoke weed, and **** ****** ****** ***. The list really goes on. With a society 100% in total conformity with this culture, sharing your thoughts about such music is almost impossible.

But why classical?

There is something very soothing yet simple from these complex melodies, but what really gets me is the amount of dedication one has towards their craft. I once observed a pianist playing a simple piece of music, then expanding with ferocity into something that cannot be read on a simple piece of paper. Taking a drabby theme and using shear emotion to make into a masterpiece, now you can’t do that with rap. It is a mystery that boggles the mind, but is shown through the expertise that musicians express when playing their instruments. And that is why I am a musician. I can somehow create this beauty that cannot be created anywhere else, and I thank the classics for that.

The “Sho-pan” of Chopin

“You’re supposed to pronounce ‘Chopin,’ ‘Sho-pan.'”

Yes, even when I was first getting into the ranks of pianism, I too mispronounced his name. I’d have to admit, I’ve been saying his name wrong for a very long time. I had just learned how to pronounce it when a teacher pointed out, “You’re supposed to pronounce ‘Chopin,’ ‘Sho-pan.'” I blame it on the craziness of the Polish Language. But within this crazy place lies a very Romantic Composer and Pianist that’s music is heard today.

… it covers a lot of Chopin’s Compositions, and there are scenes in the movie that show the brilliance of his music

Ever heard of the movie “The Pianist?” It’s one of the most heartbreaking movies out there. It tells the real true story of the Polish Pianist Władysław Szpilman‘s journey living as a Polish Jew during World War II. Szpilman is played by Adrien Brody who remarkably can play the piano fairly well! Any ways it covers a lot of Chopin’s Compositions, and there are scenes in the movie that show the brilliance of his music. The most intense part of the movie is when Szpilman gets caught hiding in a house by a Nazi Guard. Noting that he has been caught and will possible be transported to a Concentration Camp, he weans the guard. How?

Well, it is called Romantic Music for a reason.

You can almost feel the raw emotion being poured out by Szpilman, but this is a mere interpretation by Brody. There are no words to describe this lowly, heart breaking event, but it sure takes you on this ride. *sniff* *sniff*

Here is the real “Hero” Władysław Szpilman playing Chopin’s Nocturne in C Sharp Minor. You can see that this man’s soul is 100% expressed in his playing. Well, it is called Romantic Music for a reason.

Władysław Szpilman, December 5 1911 – July 6 2000. RIP

Dreaming of Rachmaninoff

Rachmaninoff pictured here was one of the most virtuosic pianists of the 19th century.

Most people my age have no idea who Sergei Rachmaninoff is, have ever heard his music, or even considered that his music has influenced such modern music.

I am a mere eighteen years old, but there is something very odd about my musical tastes.

My friends and fellow millennials have little to no knowledge of the music that came before their time. They listen to their electronic smashups and the auto tuned vocals that can make anyone who possesses vocal chords to become a superstar. It’s a sad yet very remarkable truth that plagues the youth of today. There is little to no talent within these individuals making modern music. I’m not saying all music today is total and complete trash, some young and inspiring musicians use their talents to their full potential. Back in a time where the talent and virtuosic nature existed, now exists something very unpredictable.

 His music used the elements of Russian Folk Music and this mad complexity in arrangement and composition to create an outburst of sounds unheard by the modern world.

I am a mere eighteen years old, but there is something very odd about my musical tastes. I prefer the musical genius of such Romantic and Neo Romantic musicians. When I say Romantic, I don’t literally mean it. Not any of this lovey dovey, Taylor Swift commercialized crap. When I mean Romantic, I mean the ultimate expression of ones self that is reflected through the music.

His mere observations are still very true about the music today:

The new kind of music seems to create not from the heart but from the head. Its composers think rather than feel. They have not the capacity to make their works exalt – they meditate, protest, analyze, reason, calculate and brood, but they do not exalt.

Real music is the heartbreak of life’s ultimate redemption, and if you listen to real Romanitic Music, you’ll know what I mean. Take the whole point of Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto. He had severe depression and profound writers’ block due to the critics who bashed the performance of premiere of his infamous First Symphony. He hadn’t written a single piece of music, and that was very hard on him. It wasn’t until he visited hypnotherapist Nikolai Vladimirovich Dahl that cured his depression and writers’ block. In return, Rachmaninoff wrote “the best” piece of music ever written. The Second Piano Concerto.

  Rachmaninoff’s use of the orchestra to its full potential, and the whirlwind of color from the complexity his pianistic compositions all melts in your ears as your mind starts to drift in a dream where nobody has ever ventured to.

Sergei Rachmaninoff was a very talented and a master of his craft. His music used the elements of Russian Folk Music and this mad complexity in arrangement and composition to create an outburst of sounds unheard by the modern world. Just hear it for yourself. If you want a more quality recording, click here. His use of counterpoint is astounding, and it feels like the music itself is taking your mind and soul on this emotional rollercoaster up and down, up and down. It is within this unpredictable ride that causes this uncanny attraction to this music. Rachmaninoff’s use of the orchestra to its full potential, and the whirlwind of color from the complexity his pianistic compositions all melts in your ears as your mind starts to drift in a dream where nobody has ever ventured to. Ergo, Dreaming of Rachmaninoff

I dare you to do so.